Active, focused, adult supervision is the most important safety measure to prevent a water-related tragedy involving a child. The vast majority of children who drown in pools do so in the backyards of their own homes or of relatives.

  • NEVER leave a child alone near water
    Always watch your children around swimming pools
  • Use approved flotation devices
  • If your apartment has a pool, inspect the fence and gate. If the gate does not lock or you find any other defects with the fence, report it to the apartment management immediately.
  • Bring a cell phone to the pool in case of emergency
  • Make sure there is no standing water on the pool deck.
  • Standing water is the #1 cause of slips and falls around a pool. NO RUNNING on the pool deck!
  • Enroll children over the age of 3 in swimming lessons taught by qualified instructors.However, swimming lessons don’t make your child “drown proof.” Remember, flotation devices are not a substitute for supervision.
  • REMEMBER- Swimming lessons do not make your child “Drown-Proof”!
  • Always have a first aid kit and emergency contacts handy
  • Watch for dangerous “TOOs”- Too Tired, Too Cold, Too Far from Safety, Too Much Sun, Too Much Strenuous Activity
  • Pay attention to local weather conditions and forecasts. If lightning and thunder are nearby, get out until the storm has passed.

Teach Children these safety tips:

  • Always swim with a buddy
  • Don’t dive into unknown bodies of water. Jump in feet first to avoid hitting your head on the shallow bottom.
  • Don’t push or jump on others in or around water
  • Swim in supervised areas only
  • Obey all rules and posted signs

We also recommends parents and guardians learn CPR. Seconds count if a person drowns and performing CPR quickly and correctly can save their life. For more information on local CPR classes, please contact the American Red Cross , your local hospitals or medical schools.

Finally, be prepared in case of an emergency. Keep rescue equipment and a phone next to the pool. Learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Fences and walls should be at least four-feet high and installed completely around the pool. Gates should be self-closing and self-latching. The latch should be out of reach of small children.

If a house forms one side of the barrier for the pool, doors leading from the house to the pool should be protected with alarms that sound when the doors are unexpectedly opened. Or, use a power safety cover, a motor-powered barrier placed over the water area, to prevent access by young children. For above-ground pools, steps and ladders to the pool should be secured or removed when the pool is not in use.